Self Development

Love Your Work

Love Your Work

I’m on the return leg of my almost-daily evening walk. The road is congested with people returning back from work or study. Tired, dull and listless, they trudge along slowly, wearily.

It was as if a long day in college or the office has sapped their energy, drained them of all enthusiasm. All they’re looking forward to, it seems, is getting home, relaxing, and going to sleep.

Striding along at a brisk 6 kmph, I realize that I’m walking more than twice as fast as young people half my age!

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Symbols

A Padma Shri or Padma Bhushan award is given for high accomplishment. It was desirable to win it, because it symbolized the achievement. But then, people wanted to get one – just so they could boast about winning it… and started looking for a way.

A medical college holds periodic assessment tests. That’s because they want students to study a topic. But then, undergrads began viewing tests only from the point of scoring more marks on it… and prepared accordingly.

A billionaire entrepreneur accumulates a fortune through innovation, hard work and astutely grasping a market opportunity. But then, others focused on the money alone… and tried to exploit the system to make a lot of it.

Entry into a postgraduate medical program is based on performance on an exam that assesses how well a candidate has learned the lessons of patient care at a basic level. But then, getting a high enough rank to qualify for a seat became the sole purpose of taking it.

An award is a symbol. A test is a symbol. So is money. Or a seat in graduate college.

A symbol stands for something else.

It’s a kind of surrogate – that represents a deeper, more important, more meaningful thing.

By viewing a symbol in isolation, disconnected from whatever it represents, we trivialize it. Take away most of its value.

Symbols stop being symbolic.

They become hollow.

Shallow.

Even worthless.

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I Know

Lately, I’ve had lengthy conversations with many friends I’ve known for twenty years or longer.

One thing that strikes me is how confident some are about having definitive answers to so many questions.

They know!

And they are convinced that they are right.

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There’s Always Time, If…

There's Always Enough Time

I was thinking about the biggest lessons my teachers had taught me.

There were many favorites. Mrs.Raju from 3rd grade. Mr.Daniel from high school. Dr.Laxminarayan from medical college.

And Prof.A.M.Selvaraj.

Prof.A.M.S. was my mentor throughout medical education. He was a remarkable man with an incredible work ethic. He’d wake up at 7 a.m. to read for a couple of hours before seeing patients. He’d carry on right until 2 or 3 a.m. the next morning, taking only brief breaks for a quick lunch and dinner.

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Small World

It's A Small World

It’s a SMALL world, really!

I just got off the phone. Spoke to the Director of a research lab about an internship for my daughter. And it turns out he knows me very well – from medical school, over 30 YEARS ago!

Back then, we had no Facebook or Twitter, email or smart phones.

But still, we built networksoften unconsciously.

So a student from a different college who attends classes at our hospital knows me, and remembers me… 3 decades later.

The lesson:

You’re ALWAYS part of a networkwhether you know it or not.

And you’re ALWAYS making an IMPACT.

Be aware of it. Act accordingly.

Because the effects of that impact last long.

Even many decades!

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